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Touring Route Focus!

>> Drive to Cameron Corner? From Broken Hill, two great adventures await! Sturt's Route or Along the Dingo Fence.

>> Looking for an adventure after the Darling River RunDarling River Run? How about the Bourke > Tibooburra > Broken Hill tour.

>> With Broken Hill as your base, the NEW Watershed Loop connects the Darling River to the Corner Country.

 

Cameron Corner Country

Information & Leaning

The Corner Country is the traditional home for the Wongkumara, Wadigali and Malyangapa people, and was first explored in 1845 by Charles Sturt's Inland Expedition. In 1861 the Burke and Will's expedition passed through the east of the region. Pastoralists followed exploration, and between the 1860s-1870s the area was extensively settled.

Gold was discovered in late in the 1870s, and the townships of Milparinka and Tibooburra were established.
In the 1880s a rabbit-proof fence was constructed along the border of South Australia and Queensland, intersecting at Cameron Corner. Intended to keep the region free from rabbits, the fence later became, and still is, the wild dog fence.

Networks of trade routes were established from Wilcannia to the goldfields and later from Broken Hill. During this time staging posts and shanty hotels were opened up throughout the region, and travelling stock routes and public-watering places were established to transport stock through the region.

Cameleers arrived in 1882 to save a region on the brink of starvation and remained stalwarts of transportation through until the 1920s.

The values of hard work, mateship, resilience were valued by which most of the early settlers lived, isolated from the rest of New South Wales by distance. They remain the core principles of the people of the Corner Country today, although the tyranny of distance plays a much lesser role in carving the modern-day character.


Corner Country Information & Learning

Sturt's Expedition

Sturt's Expedition

When Charles Sturt and the men of the Central Australian Expedition left Adelaide in August 1844 t...

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Burke & Wills

Burke & Wills

On the 19th of October 1860, members of the Victorian Exploring Expedition (Burke and Wills Expedi...

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Brief History

Brief History

Early European naivety, which also permeates through to modern perceptions, viewed Indigenous Aust...

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The Explorers

The Explorers

We can only imagine how it was done during the early 1800s... horses and drays, camels and having ...

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Spiritual Culture

Spiritual Culture

We, all people of on earth, live in a world of the physical, spiritual, and human, but these parad...

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Safe Outback Travel

Driving Outback Australia

Safe Outback Travel

The Outback is easily accessible and a safe place to travel. Like any journey, correct planning, preparation and common sense will ensure a memorable and wonderful experience.

Safe outback travel is about common sense and potential dangers come from the hot & dry summers and distances between towns & services.

The Outback experiences very hot and dry summers. Travel is safer and more enjoyable March – October.

The best advice for any traveller is.. “it is better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it